2016 - South Peninsular Malaysia Road Trip - Day 4

Malaysian Outward Bound Youth Association
4days road trip from KL > Kukup > Mersing > Sg. Lembing > KL
The 1,316km South Peninsular Malaysia Road Trip - 15 to 18 July 2016
Breakfast at Pollock View Resort, Sungai Lembing



Day 4 Mon. (18.7.2016) – Sungai Lembing to SubangJaya (296km)

Route: Sg Lembing > Gambah > Marang > Temerloh > Karak > Bentong > Bukit Tinggi > KL

8am - We had breakfast at the resort dining room. We were surprised to see a mini museum when the Vietnamese employee Ah Lan opened the room for us to view.

9.20am - The resort staff Ah Guan showed us the first mining tunnel in Sungai Lembing, called Pollock Tunnel, located within its compound. I had a good swim at The Pollock Tunnel which was flooded knee height at the starting portion.

10.50am - We walked around and explored the town. At the town centre is a field which was used for cricket and other games and on the distance hill-top is the museum.

11.15am - We walked through one of the three hanging bridges across the Sungai Lembing River to buy the famous coconut biscuits.

12.05pm - Visited Sungai Lembing Museum and at 12.40pm we visited the Tai Pei Tong Sungai Lembing Underground Tin Mining. We had lunch in town and at 2.15pm we drove all the way to Bukit Tinggi for dinner at Restauran Foon Lock.

It was really very relaxed and at peace with nature when we were in Sungai Lembing. Probably it was because of the large trees and greenery all around us and the slow life of the town. 

Catherine Navamani enjoyed sitting on an old trishaw owned by the resort.

Latest addition - The Pollock View Resort even has a mini museum located within its compound for guest to view. We were caught by surprise in the morning to see a resort with a museum.

An antique water filter from England.

A carbide lamp used by residents.
A very old tea pot.
A typical business sign board.

The miners from China in water painting.


The antique charcoal irons.



The kerosene hurricane lamps used by miners.

An old Chinese Abacus used as calculator.




The saws and axes used by the miners.

A good collection of very old photos of the early years of Sg. Lembing.


9.26am - This resort staff Ah Guan showed us the first mining tunnel in Sungai Lembing, called Pollock Tunnel, located within its compound.


The Pollock Tunnel which was flooded knee height at the start.

Hi there! Catherine Oon and Wei Wei.





This is what a mine tunnel looks like. See the sharp and rocky edges of the walls.

I had a good swim at The Pollock Tunnel which was flooded knee height at the starting portion.

The water was fantastically clean and clear. I wonder if they use it for the resort.




10.55am - At the town centre is a field which was used for cricket and other games and on the distance hill-top is the museum.

After the mine closed, the town went into steep decline. Many of the former miners left for greener pastures or into agriculture and logging.
Apart from the museum, the towns’ attractions include old style wooden shop-houses.

The only petrol pump in Sungai Lembing.

Thanks to its unique heritage it is starting to attract tourists with many guesthouses opening.

The only fire rescue car in town.



11.15am - We walked through one of the three hanging bridges across the Sungai Lembing River.


The Sungei Lembing river which gives the town its name, flows gently during the drier season.


Its shopping time for biscuits across the river.
We enjoyed eating the cold jelly.


This ancient cooking table still being used in this village.

Open space between houses is to prevent fire from spreading.
Another popular coconut biscuit shop.

The coconut biscuit is very crunchy and tasty. It goes along well with a cuppa of “kopi o” (black coffee).

Wei Wei and the shop proprietor who is also a Hock-chew.





12.05pm - A miner's cap with head-lamp attached at Sungai Lembing Museum.

The walk-up from ticketing office to Sungai Lembing Museum on top a hill.

The Museum itself is housed in a former British mine manager's residence, hence a historical place itself. Sungai Lembing Museum has very interesting exhibits on tin mining and the lives of the miners and managers. Officially opened on 23.04.2005.

The gigantic fire extinguisher at the entrance. More than 50 years old, this dry powder type fire extinguisher was used in the event of fire in the factory, garage, electrical parts and its surrounding areas.
This lady, Nona Baker, was the sister of the General Manager who survived the hardship during WW2. They both hid in the jungle during the Japanese invasion and were looked after by the communists who were resisting the Japanese. 








A is Amethyst, B: Agate, C: Pyrite, D: Rose Quartz and E: Serpentinite.

Tin Rocks in Sungai Lembing contained prime minerals such as cassiterite, chalcopyrite, arsenopyrite, galena, sphalerite, cobaltite and manganese minerals.

Tin ore is transported to the filtration plant where it is processed to increase the content of its tin solidity. Later, it is washed and separated in stages before being filled into special bags.

Tin Ingots ore in its powdered form which has been separated such as ilmenite, columbite, monazite and zircon, would be furnace. The melted tin will then go through further filtration to produced. Then, it is poured into a mould shaped like an ingot.


The disused mine-shafts and tunnels are not opened to visitors due to their unstable condition with frequent flooding. The British recognised the potential of the tin deposits in this area and in 1888 they signed an agreement with the Sultan of Pahang for a London-based mining company, Pahang Corporation Limited, to be given a 100-year concession to mine tin covering 2,500 acres for the grand sum of 1 cent per year. In 1925 the concession was taken over by Pahang Consolidated Company Limited (PCCL).  From 1906, when intensive mining began, until 1986, when the mine was closed following a collapse in tin prices, the mine yielded 150,000 tons of pure tin worth a cool $2 billion. 

The tin ores in those days were mined underground via various levels of tunnels. And as the years went by Sungai Lembing had the largest, longest and deepest subterranean mine with the richest deposits of tin ore in the world, second only to Bolivia.








The special bedroom is where the then Sultan of Pahang, Sultan Abu Bakar, stayed during his trips to the town, is also depicted with furnishings restored to its old days.


Sultan Abu Bakar the then Sultan of Pahang.
We can find various equipment and machines used by the English tin miners exhibited and explained.







Ching Jin Wei sitting there.

12.40pm we visited the Tai Pei Tong Sungai Lembing Underground Tin Mining. The main entrance into the mines was really cooling so everyone was excited to get in for the cool air blowing out.




Our way of saying farewell to Sungai Lembing with a group photo.


JP and Chan Nam Hong, what are you trying to carry?





The total expenses excluding transports is RM239.14 per pax.
The cost of petrol for my Subaru XV car was RM173 for 1316km.

I bought a new Subaru 2.0i XV in early July and it was only 8day old that I took it for this road-trip. Surprisingly it has good fuel consumption at 13.3km per liter of petrol driving on trunk road.

Click below to view:

South Peninsular Malaysia Road Trip - Intro
Day 1 Fri. (15.7.2016) - KL to Kukup (445km)
Day 2 Sat. (16.7.2016) – Kukup to Mersing (293km)
Day 3 Sun. (17.7.2016) – Mersing to Sg Lembing (282km)
Day 4 Mon. (18.7.2016) – Sg Lembing to Subang Jaya, KL (296km)
///

No comments:

Post a Comment