2016 - Diamond Creek Country Retreat

A night at Diamond Creek Country Retreat
Tanjong Malim, Perak on 23.07.2016
An assortment of durians - D2, D24, D101, Musang King and the ever popular Kampung Durian.

We were invited to stay for a fruit retreat, where we had all the fruits available at this time of year. As the afternoon rain was pouring down, we had the best of durians and other fruits. My granddaughter Isabelle Ching was playing in the rain for the first time in her life. Dinner was at Restoran Ga Onn @ Tanjung Malim. After dinner we continued eating the fruits when Ray Lee brought in a basket of Dragon fruit he planted in his farm nearby. Chan Ying Wai brought a pot of pork knuckle stew which he cooked at his bungalow nearby. Evening was guitar jamming at Steven Hor​'s bungalow down the road.

No 7 & 9, Jalan Bunga Raya 3b, Diamond Creek Country Retreat. 35900 Tanjong Malim, Perak. (GPS coordinates 3.767319, 101.523320)

No 7 & 9, Jalan Bunga Raya 3b, Diamond Creek Country Retreat. 35900 Tanjong Malim, Perak. (GPS coordinates 3.767319, 101.523320)

A scenic view of the valley below from our bungalow.

From here you could see the 6 layer of hills and the mountain at the distance is Gunung Liang at 6343 feet ( 1933 meters).

A nice concrete gazebo between two bungalows for fellowship dinner and meeting.

George Ling bought all the fruits from the local farmers. We were just ready to start off with the fruit feast. — with Ching Jin Wei, Catherine Oon, George Ling, Caason Ching, Winnie Law and Pengkieng Ng.



This is the sweet Duku-Langsat locally grown.

This are mangosteen.

This is D101 durian sometimes is known as IOI.

We sincerely agreed that the best is D101 durian. — with Chan Nam Hong.


This is the Musang King durian.



It was playtime for this 4year old Isabelle Ching.

My granddaughter Isabelle was playing in the rain for the first time in her life.
My granddaughter Isabelle was jumping up and down under the rain.
Isabelle was feeding the fish. — with Caason Ching, Isabelle Ching and George Ling.


Layers of cloud rising up after the afternoon rain.

The best place to sit and rest with a perfect view of the valley below.

More layers of cloud rising up above the hills after the afternoon rain.

The giant yam plants beside the bungalow.
What!
Isabelle Ching enjoyed jumping after changing to dry clothes.
Display of wild flowers by Isabelle Ching.

Dinner was at Restoran Ga Onn @ Tanjung Malim.


Nothing left for me to take a picture!




Night view of No 7 & 9, Jalan Bunga Raya 3b, Diamond Creek Country Retreat. 35900 Tanjong Malim, Perak.

Night view of No 7 & 9, Jalan Bunga Raya 3b, Diamond Creek Country Retreat. 35900 Tanjong Malim, Perak.

A night view of the gazebo. We continued with the fruit feast.

We stayed a night at No.9, Jalan Bunga Raya 3b, Diamond Creek Country Retreat. 35900 Tanjong Malim, Perak. This is the first lounge. — with Catherine Oon.

This is the second lounge area.

This is the dinning area.

This is the kitchen between the lounge and dinning area.

Our bed room.

The second bed room. There are 4 rooms in this bungalow.

Evening was guitar jamming at Steven Hor's bungalow. Since I did not bring my bass guitar, I had to play drum for the band. — with Steven KH Hor.

The main singer was Steven Hor and Ng Peng Kieng was the other singer. They all sang very well after a few cans of beer. Not too bad, the two singers could sing their hearts out.



Day 2 - We had honey for breakfast at Steven Hor's stingless bee farm. Second breakfast was at Sunny Hor's bungalow. George Ling then drove us to the river for a swim. Lunch was at Ga Onn restaurant again before we say goodbye.

A morning view of the gazebo with a fish pond beside it.

Wild flowers in the garden.


The interior of the second bungalow at No 7 Jalan Bunga Raya 3b, Diamond Creek Country Retreat.



In the morning after breakfast we walked around to view some of the other bungalows.

This bungalow belongs to Chan Ying Wai.

We helped to lawn the garden grass.

A view of the fish pond down the valley.

Chan Ying Wai's kayaks used in the fish pond.

This is a rugged ATV (All Terrain Vehicle) which cost a few thousands.

Steven Hor's bungalow and his music house beside.

This was where we jammed last night at Steven Hor's place. I should get my full band here next trip.

The beautiful Steven Hor's bungalow.

The creek beside Steven Hor's bungalow. — with Winnie Law and Caason Ching.


At the jamming house with Isabelle on drums.

At Steven Hor's Stingless bee farm beside the creek. He has 180 hives.


This is the entrance pipe of Stingless bees, sometimes called stingless honey bees or simply meliponines of about 500 species. The bees build a wax pipe in the entrance of their nest.

Stingless bees usually nest in hollow trunks, tree branches, underground cavities or rock crevices.

Many beekeepers keep the bees in their original log hive or transfer them to a wooden box, as this makes it easier to control the hive.

At any one time, hives can contain 300–80,000 workers, depending on species.

The bees store pollen and honey in large, egg-shaped pots made of beeswax mixed with various types of plant resin; this combination is sometimes referred to as "cerumen" (which is, incidentally, the medical term for earwax). These pots are often arranged around a central set of horizontal brood combs, wherein the larvae are housed.

This is how to suck honey from the honey comb using a straw.

This is how to suck honey from the honey comb using a straw.


Second breakfast was at Sunny Hor's bungalow on top a hill. — with Steven KH Hor and Chan Nam Hong.

Second breakfast was at Sunny Hor's bungalow.



This is Sunny Hor's renovated bungalow.

Sunny Hor's stingless bee farm.

View of other bungalows.

Steven drove us to visit his Taiwanese friend who has successfully breed Sturgeon Fish in large concrete tanks.

The Taiwanese guy is explaining how to breed the fish in large tanks. — with Steven KH Hor.

Sturgeon are harvested for their roe which is processed into caviar—a luxury food and the reason why caviar producing sturgeons are among the most valuable of all wildlife resources.

Sturgeon fisheries are of great value, primarily as a source for caviar and also for flesh.




An abandoned clubhouse of Diamond Creeks Country Retreat. The 1,620ha project site was launched in 1993 but abandoned in 1996, with 60 per cent of the first phase completed. There had been no work on other phases.

The purchasers claimed that they had invested in the properties worth RM150,000 to RM1.5 million. They want the project to be revived and properly maintained by developer Golden Approach Sdn Bhd.

There are 200 lots under Phase 1. All there was, they said, were 20 completed bungalows, an abandoned clubhouse, a larvae-ridden swimming pool, a jungle in place of a golf course, and a half-built equestrian centre. The promised clubhouse, 18-hole golf course and equestrian club are half-finished dilapidated buildings, overgrown with shrubs and infested with mosquitoes. Some house owners also complained that their orchards and bungalow plots had not seen any development since they bought them a decade ago.

George Ling then drove us to the river for a swim.







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