EBC trek Day 06 - Deboche trek 10km to Dingboche (4,412m/14,471ft)

Day 06 (02.11.17) - Deboche (3,820m) trek 10km to Dingboche (4,412m/14,471ft). Walking time: 5 hrs. Difference in elevation: +545m.

The trail from Deboche was walking through the rhododendron forest and crossing a bridge over the raging Imja Khol River. Hug the valley wall, and then traverse the plains to Dingboche, the start of the Imja Tse Valley. Dingboche is also the gateway to Chukung and farther beyond for the most challenging traverses towards Makalu area and Hinko Valley via Sherpani col 6,100m and Amphu Laptsa pass 5,780m.

Evening temperature was minus 10 degree Celsius.


The best place to be when feeling cold.

The morning temperature was minus 10 degree Celsius.

06.45am - We had our breakfast.


Garlic omelette to combat high altitude sickness.



07.30am - Started our trek towards Dingboche.

Team A: Ching Neng Bin, Ong Teik Hong and Alan Koh.

Icing on the grass in the morning.

The morning view outside our lodge in Deboche.

The morning view outside our lodge in Deboche.

Another lodge in Deboche.

Leaving the farmland in Deboche for Dingboche.

Leaving the farmhouse in Deboche for Dingboche.

As we get higher up, the landscape is going to change... these are going to be the last trees we can see.































Greens will no longer be common at higher altitudes.





Came across a broken bridge along the way.

Crossing one of the last suspension bridges.

The Imja Khola is a tributary of the Dudh Kosi in Nepal. It drains the slopes of Mount Everest. The Khumbu Glacier melts into the Lobujya River, which flows southward as the Imja Khola to its confluence with the Dudh Kosi at Tengboche.

Crossing the suspension bridge over the Imja Khola river... with the broken bridge by the side.


A gradual up slope all the way to Pangboche.

A gradual slope all the way to Pangboche.









The village in front is Pangboche. Ama Dablam on the right... Nuptse and Lhotse on the left.

The village in front is Pangboche. Ama Dablam on the right... Nuptse and Lhotse on the left.

08.55am - Pangboche is also actually a base camp for those climbing up Ama Dablam.

Exiting Pangboche and heading towards Dingboche, we are seeing less and less greens.

This is the part where things get tough.

...because the altitude is now 4000m where people can start to get high altitude sickness easily.

...because the altitude is now 4000m where people can start to get high altitude sickness easily.



The next village at a distance is Shomare.











10am - Shomare village at 4040m.




No more trees now... only bushes and shrubs.

Simon Loh the drone king found a perfect flat land to fly his DJI.

Dingboche is not far ahead.





The path is now sandy and rocky.

You can even see ice/snow here and there.

Traversing across the bridge towards Dingboche.

No more buffaloes... only yaks thrive high up here.

You can see Dingboche in the distance.






Welcome to Dingboche (4410m). The Imja River flows directly east of the Dingboche village.

Welcome to Dingboche (4410m).

The Imja River flows directly east of the Dingboche village.

Dingboche is a popular stop for trekkers and climbers headed to Mount Everest, Ama Dablam or Imja Tse. Parties will typically spend two nights in Dingboche for acclimatization purposes. The village relies heavily on tourists with lodges and tenting areas comprising most of Dingboche. The Imja River flows directly east of the village.

A helicopter landing pad is located just west of the Imja River, near Moonlight Lodge. Dingboche is home to an Internet cafe (using satellite technology) and one of the world's highest billiard parlors.

12.30pm - Arrived at Dingboche at 4,410m.


One of the characteristics of Dingboche is the kilometers of stone walls, built using the stones of different sizes that cover the entire Valley of Imja. These stones are removed in order to plow the soil and end up being piled one over the other creating kilometers of walls.





One of the characteristics of Dingboche is the kilometers of stone walls, built using the stones of different sizes that cover the entire Valley of Imja. These stones are removed in order to plow the soil and end up being piled one over the other creating kilometers of walls.






Had the hash brown with cheese + fried egg for lunch at our accommodation, Yak Lodge Dingboche... too salty.





Some dried chilli to spice things up.

Entered the kitchen to have a look at what the chef are up to.

Chef preparing vege roll.

Keeping ourselves warm... temperature is now close to zero.








The guides spending their time playing card games... It's a very simplified version of Dai di where only a single card is played at once..

Dinner at our accommodation, Yak Lodge Dingboche.  Eating fruits before dinner.
Dinner at our accommodation, Yak Lodge Dingboche.
Dinner at our accommodation, Yak Lodge Dingboche.
At altitude above 4000m... our appetide starts to fade and all we want to eat/drink is soup... garlic soup should keep the altitude sickness at bay.
Another soup for dinner... this time potato soup... not too bad.
Our room in Yak Lodge Dingboche... spacious...!
click below to view:
EBC trek Day 01 (28.10.17) – Kuala Lumpur KLIA to Kathmandu (1,334m/4,375ft)
EBC trek Day 02 (29.10.17) – Kathmandu fly to Lukla (2,865m) and trek 8km to Phakding
EBC trek Day 03 (30.10.17) – Phakding trek 10.4km to Namche Bazaar (3,445m/11,299ft)
EBC trek Day 04 (31.10.17) - Acclimatization day at Namche Bazaar (3,445m/11,299ft)
EBC trek Day 05 (01.11.17) - Namche Bazaar trek 10km to Deboche (3,867m/12,684ft)
 

EBC trek Day 06 (02.11.17) - Deboche trek 10km to Dingboche (4,412m/14,471ft)
EBC trek Day 07 (03.11.17) - Acclimatization day at Dingboche (4,412m/14,471ft)
EBC trek Day 08 (04.11.17) - Dingboche trek 12km to Lobuche (4,931m/16,174 ft)
EBC trek Day 09 (05.11.17) - Lobuche 8km to Gorakshep trek to EBC (5,364m/17,595ft)
EBC trek Day 10 (06.11.17) - Gorakshep to Kalapattha and fly back to Kathmandu
EBC trek Day 11 (07.11.17) - Kathmandu 'The Good, the Bad and the Ugly’
 

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